Counties Served & Courthouse Directions
 



Cameran A. Bahrami
301-762-0303


Cameran A. Bahrami was born and raised in the DC area and received his undergraduate degree from the University of Maryland, College Park. He received his Juris Doctorate from Catholic University of America in Washington, DC.

 

The Four Most Common Charges Related to Driving with a Suspended or Revoked License

While police in the state of Maryland can charge you with a variety of different crimes related to driving with a suspended or revoked license, there are four in particular that are more common than the rest. They are:

1.) Driving on a Suspended License [TA 16-303(h)]

Maryland recognizes two different types of Suspended License charges. This one is the lesser of the two, and is a crime punishable by up to 60 days in a jail, a $500 fine and up to 3 points on your driving record.

This charge is used when your driver’s license was suspended or revoked as part of what’s known as an “administrative sanction”: if you fail to appear at court date, or if you fail to pay the proper fine after being found guilty of an offense, the Maryland courts have the ability to impose a suspension or revocation of your driver’s license — even if the charge you failed to appear (or failed to pay the fine for) for was unrelated to driving your car.

If you are pulled over while driving after your license has been suspended for this reason, you will be charged under this section of the code. The penalties for this charge, while stiff, are lesser than the one addressed below on the theory that your suspension was related to a failure to appear at court (or respect its final judgment) rather than any active misconduct, per se.

2.) Driving on a Suspended License [TA 16-303(c)]

A charge of Driving on a Suspended License under this section is far more grave than the one described above. Whereas that charge concerns driving under a license suspended as a court sanction, this section of the code is reserved for situations where you are caught driving with a license that was suspended due to a poor or reckless driving record. It is punishable by 12 months of jail, a $1000 fine and up to 12 points on your driving record.

This is the section of the code that most people whose licenses have been suspended are charged under; it covers everything except licenses that have been suspended for failure to appear in court or pay court-appointed fees. For example, you will be charged under this section of code if your license was suspended for accumulating an excessive number of points on your driving record, if your license was suspended for failure to attend a court-mandated driver improvement program, if your license was suspended for failure to pay child support (in any state, not just Maryland), or if your license was suspended because you have an outstanding warrant.

Understand that this is not a comprehensive list; again, you will be charged under this section of the code if you are caught driving under a license that was suspended for any reason other than failure to appear at court or pay a fine as covered in TA 16-303(h).

3.) Driving on a Revoked License [TA 16-303(d)]

A charge for Driving on a Revoked License is even more serious than one of driving under a suspended one: it carries a maximum penalty of 12 months in jail, a $1000 fine and up to 12 points on your driving record. You will be charged under this section of the code if you are caught driving with a license that has been revoked for any appropriate reason. Aside from the penal consequences described above, a conviction for Driving on a Revoked License will also significantly extend the amount of time you are forbidden the privilege of driving in the state of Maryland.

4.) Driving on Out of State Suspended or Revoked License [TA 16-303(f), 16-303(g) & 16-303(i)]

It is just as illegal to drive in Maryland on a license that has been suspended or revoked in another state as it is on a Maryland license. The penalties for these charges are identical to those discussed above. The one difference between these charges and the earlier ones is that, in court, the State has the responsibility of proving not only that your license was suspended or revoked, but that you were given adequate notice of the suspension/revocation as well.